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How To Make My Son Do His Homework


In this article, I will share the secret on motivating your child to not only do homework but also love homework. Yes, you read it right. It is possible to love doing school work. No yelling, screaming, threatening or crying required.




how to make my son do his homework


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At the beginning of her kindergarten year, my daughter was given two homework books to take home. The teacher would assign homework from the books every week. They were supposed to be used for the entire school year. But my kindergartener liked doing homework so much that she finished them all in one month! No yelling, screaming, threatening, or crying is required.


Getting your kid to do homework is only the first step in building a good learning habit. Finishing homework or getting good grades is not the purpose of going to school. Instill the love of learning in your child early on and your child will benefit for life.


Parents around the world would love the magic formula to encourage kids to do their homework. Alas, it's not as simple as waving a wand, but there are some methods for encouraging your kids to develop and stick to a regular homework routine. For some parents, effective encouragement will also be about changing your own approach to homework enforcement. Don't worry, it's not hard, it's just about taking a moment to work it through. Create a homework space and schedule, establish clear expectations, rewards, and consequences, and approach homework positively.


It is helpful to set a time every day to complete homework. This time must be used for study whether the child has homework or not. When children have homework, they know they must do it during this time.


Contact the teacher as soon as you suspect your child has a homework problem (as well as when you think he's having any major problems with his schoolwork). Schools have a responsibility to keep you informed about your child's performance and behavior and you have a right to be upset if you don't find out until report-card time that your child is having difficulties. On the other hand, you may figure out that a problem exists before the teacher does. By alerting the teacher, you can work together to solve a problem in its early stages.


Request a meeting with the teacher to discuss homework problems. Tell him briefly why you want to meet. You might say, "Rachel is having trouble with her math homework. I'm worried about why she can't finish the problems and what we might do to help her." If English is your second language, you may need to make special arrangements, such as including in the meeting someone who is bilingual.


Let the teacher know whether your child finds the assignments too hard or too easy. (Teachers also like to know when their students are particularly excited about an assignment.) Of course, not all homework assignments can be expected to interest your child and be perfectly suited to her. Teachers just don't have time to tailor homework to the individual needs of each student. However, most teachers want to assign homework that their students can complete successfully and they welcome feedback.


  • Is the homework often too hard? Maybe your child has fallen behind and will need extra help from the teacher or a tutor to catch up.

  • Does your child need to make up a lot of work because of absences? The first step might be working out a schedule with the teacher.

  • Does your child need extra support beyond what home and school can give her? Ask the teacher, school guidance counselor or principal if there are mentor programs in your community. Mentor programs pair a child with an adult volunteer who assists with the child's special needs. Many schools, universities, community organizations, churches and businesses offer excellent mentoring programs.



At the end of the meeting, it may help to summarize what you've agreed to do: "OK, so to keep track of Kim's assignments, I'll check her assignment book each night and write my initials beside new assignments. Each day you'll check to make sure she's written down all new assignments in her book. That way we'll be certain that I know what her assignments are."


Follow up to make sure that the approach you agreed to is working. If the teacher told you, for example, that your child needs to spend more time practicing long division, check back in a month to talk about your child's progress.


Helping your child with homework is an opportunity to improve your child's chances of doing well in school and life. By helping your child with homework, you can help him learn important lessons about discipline and responsibility. You can open up lines of communication—between you and your child and you and the school. You are in a unique position to help your child make connections between school work and the "real world," and thereby bring meaning (and some enjoyment) to your child's homework experience.


Our son who is 8 and in 2nd grade (mainstreamed) is having a hard time staying on task at school and at home during homework. He is very bright, knows how to do the work but gets distracted so easily. Hate the thought of having to medicate him.


People need to realize that the amount of energy and concentration required for a kid with Aspergers to make it through a normal school day is immense. Having to do homework that is often pointless is asking too much. I negotiate with my child's teacher every year around the homework, so it is actually helpful and it is not a big deal, otherwises it just adds stress on top of stress at the end of a busy day. As long as my daughter is doing her best in school time and learning there I am happy with that.


Homework was just about to tear our family apart so I contacted the autism specialist for the school district and explained the problems we were having. She said there was no need for our family to be disrupted over homework, so we sat down with his teacher and revised his IEP to say that no homework was to be sent home with him/ Problem solved. That was two years ago. He works on what would be homework during class if he has time. Hiss grades have not dropped since we stopped the homework. The IEP is your friend so use it to your child's advantage.


Rachel I know just what you mean in getting the proper diagnose! I was told the same, boys will be boys, he'll out grow it, let him pay the consequences for not having his homework done! I never gave up. He's had severe anger outbursts, ALWAYS had homework issues from first grade. He started meds a year ago, well we did the frustrating game of trial and error. He's now on Celexa and Risperdyl. I want to get him OFF Risperdyl because of the side effects it carries!He's been diagnosed with being defiant, and touches highly in the spectrum of autism.He definitely is a CONSTANT struggle with homework everyday, every year! He's is 6th grade, gets great grades, but recently some of his grades have fallen. Due to not turning in all of his homework, I didn't know this was happening.I am at wits end with this struggle! Feel free to email me atMichele51167@Gmail.com


He always did his homework eventually, and it generally only took him 15 or so minutes to complete. But the hours spent asking and nagging and pleading were glaringly disproportionate to the time and effort it took him to actually do it.


I know many schools do this. Hence I chose a school for my daughters where learning is made to happen more through fun and engaging activities and elementary kids are not given homework on most days.


But I helped her write a daily routine checklist where I asked her to create a schedule for herself. I let her decide the break times and the time during which she wanted to write her homework and study the notes.


A natural consequence would be to let them experience the consequence from their teacher. If they forget to turn in the homework on time or forget their books at school, you do not need to spend hours solving their math problems.


A logical consequence would be to cut hours from their screen time and playtime because they are most probably getting away from doing homework doing these. Or any consequence related to the situation you experience.


However, with the right homework plan, it is possible to help motivate ADHD children to complete their assignments on time, study for tests, and become responsible, successful students. While completing schoolwork will likely always be more difficult due to their struggles with focus, there are strategies that can help mitigate this weakness and maximize their available resources to increase their productivity.


That being said, a homework schedule can help students be more disciplined and productive because, without it, most children would rather turn on the TV, play a video game, or browse social media instead of completing their homework. In children with ADD, these issues are exacerbated, as their ability to plan and organize their day (executive functioning) is already hindered due to their attention deficit disorder.


When creating a homework schedule, remember to include breaks, as most children will need a few minutes to relax so that they can better focus on their work. Many researchers have pointed out that the average attention span of children and adults is only around 20 minutes. Beyond this point, it becomes increasingly difficult to pay attention to the task at hand. So, by giving children a brief, 5-10 minute break, they will be better able to focus on their assignments without becoming too tired or fatigued.


Knowing when to schedule these homework breaks will require a bit of trial and error, as every child is different. However, including a break as part of the schedule somewhere around the 20 or 30-minute mark is generally a good place to start. During these scheduled breaks, it would be a good idea to have healthy snacks readily available to ensure that your child has enough energy to power through their assignments. Parents should encourage children to stand up and walk around during these breaks, but to avoid activities that are too stimulating or too far away from the task at hand.


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